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Massachusetts woman scammed by fake Vince Gill account

Massachusetts woman scammed by fake Vince Gill account

I can’t say whether scammers are getting more creative these days. Maybe people are just getting dumber. Either way, for many looking to make a quick buck, impersonating a celebrity is an easy business. Now someone is getting away with scamming a woman in Massachusetts by posing as Vince Gill.

Recently a podcast was released entitled Fraud stories describes the story in which a con artist swindles a Massachusetts mother out of a lot of money. Her daughter Jackie tells the story and explains her mother’s bizarre behavior. She becomes secretive and mysterious, which makes the daughter suspicious. During the Christmas season, Jackie searches the mother’s phone to investigate.

Eventually, Jackie finds texts on Google that suggest her mother is talking to “the real Vince Gill.” Given the comments on social media, the mother is clearly desperate to connect with one of her favorite artists. The daughter explains, “She followed the real Vince Gill. I’m sure it’s a managed account, not him. She commented, ‘Oh, we love you in Boston! We hope you come to Boston.’ After looking at that, we could see that other people had liked it, and then we started looking at the people who were following my mom. They were fake Vince Gill accounts. Things like ‘official,’ but the ‘L’ was a one instead of an ‘L.'”

Vince Gill scammer bleeds poor woman’s money dry

Unfortunately, by the time the rest of the family scrambles to get her out of the trap, all of the poor mother’s money is practically gone. The con man, posing as Vince Gill, uses a pretty sordid story to get his hands on a lot of money. “They told this sad story that (Vince’s) wife Amy Grant divorced him because he was accused of raping a young girl in a hotel. And that girl wanted $350,000 to keep quiet about it ever happening,” Jackie says.

The scammer loots her mother’s three accounts, including her retirement savings. To prevent the scammer from ruining other people’s lives, Jackie turns to Vince Gill’s PR team. But they don’t respond. Either they don’t care or they don’t want anything to do with it.

Ultimately, I ask people to use their common sense. These celebrities don’t need your money, not Vince Gill or anyone else. If they really need money desperately, they won’t approach you directly for donations.